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Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe & Video

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The Chocolate Chip Cookie is America's most famous cookie. It was invented in 1930 by Ruth Wakefield, who was the owner of the Toll House Inn in Massachusetts. The story goes that one day she decided to add small chunks of a Nestle's Semisweet Yellow Label Chocolate bar to her cookie dough. The 'chocolate chip' cookies were an instant hit with her customers. Word must have spread of how good these cookies were, because by 1939 Nestle was selling small chocolate morsels (or chips) in a yellow bag. Nestle went on to buy the rights to the Toll House name and to Ruth Wakefield's 'chocolate chip' cookie recipe. They called her recipe "The Famous Toll House Cookie" and printed it on the back of their Yellow bag of chocolate chips.

This Chocolate Chip Cookie recipe is very similar to the recipe that is on the back of the bag of Nestle's Chocolate Chips. The batter is made with unsalted butter and a combination of white and brown sugars. It produces a rich and chewy cookie with beautifully crisp edges. 

For the chocolate chips, you can use semi sweet, bittersweet, milk, or even white chocolate chips. Or you could use a combination. While I prefer my chocolate chip cookies without nuts, you can fold in one cup (100 grams) of chopped walnuts, pecans, or hazelnuts.

This recipe produces about 32 - 3 inch (7.5 cm) cookies. The batter can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple of days if you don't want to bake all the cookies at once. You can also freeze this dough. To do this, form the dough into round balls, flatten them slightly, and place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Freeze and then place the balls of dough in a plastic freezer bag, seal, and freeze. When baking, simply place the frozen balls of dough on a baking sheet and bake as directed. You may have to increase the baking time by a few minutes.

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Chocolate Chip Cookies: Preheat your oven to 375 degrees F (190 degrees C) and place the oven rack in the center of the oven. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper.

In the bowl of your electric stand mixer, fitted with the paddle attachment (or with a hand mixer), beat the butter until smooth. Add the white and brown sugars, and vanilla extract, and beat until smooth and fluffy (about 1 - 2 minutes). Add the eggs, one at a time, beating until incorporated. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl as needed.

In a separate bowl, whisk the flour with the baking soda and salt. Add the dry ingredients, and chocolate chips, to the egg mixture and beat just until incorporated. If you find the dough very soft, cover and refrigerate until firm (from 30 to 60 minutes). (The batter can be stored in the refrigerator for a couple of days.)

For large cookies, drop about 2 tablespoons of batter (35 grams) (can use an ice cream scoop), onto the prepared baking sheets, spacing them several inches (about 7.5 cm) apart. With the palm of your hand, gently flatten each ball into a round. If desired, gently press four or five chocolate chunks or chips into the batter. Bake about 10 - 12 minutes, or until golden brown around the edges but the centers will still be a little soft. Cool completely on wire rack.

Makes about 32 cookies.

Note: You can freeze this dough. Form the dough into balls, flatten slightly, and place on a parchment lined baking sheet. Freeze and then place the balls of dough in a plastic bag, seal, and freeze. When baking, simply place the frozen balls of dough on a baking sheet and bake as directed. You may have to bake the cookies a few minutes longer than stated in the recipe.

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Chocolate Chip Cookies Recipe:

1 cup (225 grams) unsalted butter, at room temperature

3/4 cup (150 grams) granulated white sugar

3/4 cup (160 grams) light brown sugar (firmly packed)

2 large (100 grams) eggs, at room temperature

1 1/2 teaspoons (6 grams) pure vanilla extract

2 1/4 cups (295 grams) all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon (4 grams) baking soda

1/2 teaspoon (2 grams) salt

1 1/2 cups (270 grams) semisweet or bittersweet chocolate chips

Garnish:

Chocolate Chunks or Chips

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